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COMPANIES AND STAKEHOLDERS RENEW THEIR CONFIDENCE IN NME: EXHIBITION’S SECOND EDITION BECOMES THE FOCAL POINT IN ITALY FOR DISCUSSIONS ON GREEN PUBLIC TRANSPORT

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COMPANIES AND STAKEHOLDERS RENEW THEIR CONFIDENCE IN NME: EXHIBITION’S SECOND EDITION BECOMES THE FOCAL POINT IN ITALY FOR DISCUSSIONS ON GREEN PUBLIC TRANSPORT

READ THE PRESS RELEASE

Sustainable mobility: this is how the country is changing
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Sustainable mobility is changing Italian cities. Milan, Genoa, Bari, Taranto, Bergamo and Rome are investing in greener transport solutions to reduce traffic and emissions.

Urban regeneration and sustainable mobility. Two intertwined elements are reshaping the urban fabric of our cities. Thanks to investments planned over the past few years and those promoted by the PNRR, many urban centres are looking at sustainable mobility as an opportunity to enhance their areas and improve the lives of their citizens. Milan, in this sense, is the leader. And the opening of the new M4 metro last June represents an acceleration towards zero-emission transport. When fully operational, the new line will reduce traffic by 180,000 vehicles per day (30 million fewer car journeys per year) and reduce CO2 (carbon dioxide) emissions by up to 10,300 tonnes per year: pollutant emissions will be reduced by 2%, which will have a significant impact on the health of citizens and the surrounding environment. However, Milan is not alone. Among the cities that will change their look in the coming years is Genoa with the “4 Axes of Strength” project, which envisages the construction of a trolleybus system on the main routes through the Ligurian capital. In total, the network of lines will stretch 96 kilometres from Levante to Ponente and in the valleys, passing through downtown, and will be covered by 145 trolley buses and electric buses. It is an ambitious project involving civil works, installations and technological infrastructure, and will be implemented in progressive stages. From Genoa to Bari and Taranto. Indeed, the two Apulian cities are at the forefront of the energy transition by enhancing their mobility service with new Brt (Bus rapid transit) lines that will increase commercial speed while reducing emissions. The same choice applies to the city of Bergamo, which has a dowry of no less than EUR 80 million for a Brtsystem that will connect the city to Dalmine. Hydrogen, instead, is the focus in Bologna. Tper, the transport company that runs the service in the Emilia capital, opted for 127 “H2” buses for an investment of over 90 million euros. In Rome work is underway on a major renewal of the fleet and the expansion of tram and metro lines.